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Lalji family donates $8 million gift to St. Paul’s

October 30th, 2020
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The Lalji family know a lot about transformation. For three generations, they’ve not only put down their own roots in Vancouver, their community-focussed philanthropy has helped countless other families do the same. When asked if they would like to be part of the transformation of health care that will benefit all British Columbians, they went all in with a leadership gift of $8 million in support of the new St. Paul’s.

The Laljis recognize that the new St. Paul’s at the Jim Pattison Medical Centre is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to push the boundaries of compassionate health care, life-changing research, and training opportunities for the next generation of health care providers. (Did you know, St. Paul’s trains hundreds of BC’s doctors, nurses, and allied health professionals every year?)

It’s an ambitious project that includes so much more than the new hospital itself. For example, the campus will include a multi-million-dollar heath innovation hub to bring patients, researchers, clinicians, and industry partners together to collaborate on the development of new drugs, treatments, and therapies.

And it’s poised to become the centrepiece of a neighbourhood-wide “innovation precinct.” Think Silicon Valley, but for health sciences: a global leader in health research and discovery; a place to grow BC companies in life sciences, bio-technology, and digital health; a catalyst to spur BC’s economic recovery in the wake of the global pandemic.

From the beginning, our community has given of their time, expertise, and generosity to take St. Paul’s from a 25-bed cottage at the muddy end of Burrard Street to what will become a state-of-the-art health innovation campus on Station Street in 2026. The support of generous donors like the Lalji family has never been more important. Your donations have never had more impact.

– By Kris Wallace

“Research at the new St. Paul’s isn’t just going to help us get better and smarter at diagnosing and treating disease. It’s going to make us better and smarter at understanding it, treating it with more precision, and, hopefully, even curing it.” – Dr. Darryl Knight, VP, Research and Academic Affairs, Providence Health Care

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